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Transfer Program - English - Lake Land College, Mattoon, IL
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Transfer Program

English (AA.ENG)



The English transfer program emphasizes literature, writing, and related areas and is designed to provide a solid background for work at the junior and senior levels in English.

A student who follows the recommended course sequence for English majors will be able to:

  • -use critical thinking, investigation, and reflection to interact with texts and ideas;
  • -judge the value of the literary endeavor by identifying, generating, and applying the appropriate critical vocabulary;
  • -explain what motivates people to read and what motivates writers to produce literary works;
  • -examine the cultural and historical factors that influence the reader, writer and text; and
  • -appraise how literature relates to an understanding of ourselves and the world.



Consult both the following list of major requirements and an academic advisor before registering, as expectations of English departments at four-year colleges vary. For example, some have a foreign language requirement.


Specific graduation requirements are identified through degree audit. Additional developmental courses in math, reading and English may be required based on placement scores. Only courses with a course number of 100 or higher meet graduation requirements for AA/AS/AES degrees.


For more information contact:
Humanities/Communications Division Chair
(217) 234-5271
shortens@lakeland.cc.il.us

* There are prerequisites or course requisites for this course
** Electives must be approved by Program Coordinator or Division Chair
one cross Course only offered fall semester
Footnote 2 Course only offered spring and summer semester
Footnote 3 Course only offered spring semester
Footnote 4 Courses offered in odd numbered years only
Footnote 5 Courses offered in even numbered years only
Footnote 6 SOS 050 Human Relations and PSY 271 Introduction to Psychology cannot be used as a social science elective
Footnote 7 Consult Academic Advisor for appropriate course
1 N/A
2 N/A




First Year
First Semester
ENG 120
Students will study the writing process by reading essays that illustrate a variety of rhetorical strategies, analyzing writing tasks and texts, and writing, revising, and editing short essays.


Course Outline


Composition I *
3
HIS 155
A survey of early American history viewed with an emphasis on the political, social, economic, and ideological foundations of the Republic. Major topics include colonialism, revolution, federalism, nationalism, sectionalism, expansion, slavery, religion, Civil War.

Course Outline


History of the United States I
3
HIS 156
Views U.S. History since the end of Reconstruction with emphasis on how the domestic and international conflicts helped shape our modern society.

Course Outline


or
History of the United States II
 
MAT 116
Survey of mathematical topics with emphasis on solutions to real life problems. Topics will include sets/logic, counting techniques, probability, and statistics. Problem solving projects involving detailed written solutions will be required. Calculators and computers will be used.


Course Outline


General Education Math *
3
MAT 125
Application of elementary principles of descriptive statistics including frequency distribution, graphical presentation, measure of location and variation. Elements of probability, sampling techniques, binomial and normal distribution and other topics.


Course Outline


or
Statistics
*
 
HUM 150
Students will survey the human condition as revealed through the arts, including an examination of painting, sculpture, architecture, literature, drama, film, photography, and music.

Course Outline


Humanities through the Arts
3
SPE 111
Focuses on the fundamental principles and methods of selection, analyzing, organizing, developing and communicating information, evidence, and points of view to audiences.

Course Outline


Introduction to Speech Communication
3
  Total Semester Hours:
15
 
Second Semester
ENG 121
Students will learn how to find, use, assess and document research sources, producing an extended writing project based primarily on library research.


Course Outline


Composition II *
3
LIT 130
N/A

Introduction to Literature *
3
HIS 250
A survey of the political, economic, cultural and social development of Western Civilization to 1660. Topics include prehistory, ancient near east, Greco-Roman world, Germanic migrations, middle ages, Renaissance and Reformation, and the beginnings of the Modern World.

Course Outline


Western Civilization to 1660
3
HIS 252
Survey of Western Civilization with topics including absolutism, the rise of modern science, the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, the Age of Ideology, Imperialism, the Russian Revolutions, World War I, the Rise of Totalitarianism, World War II and the Contemporary Age.

Course Outline


or
Western Civilization 1660-Present
 
N/A

Humanities/Fine Arts (IAI H or IAI F)
3
N/A

Science (IAI P)
4
  Total Semester Hours:
16
 

Second Year
First Semester
PHI 290
Introduction to formal reasoning, including: language and meaning, deduction and induction, evidence, syllogistic argument and science and hypotheses.

Course Outline


Introduction to Logic
3
N/A

Social/Behavioral Science (IAI S)
3
N/A

Elective
3
N/A

Two Literature Electives *
6
  Total Semester Hours:
15
 
Second Semester
N/A

Science (IAI L)
3 - 4
N/A

Literature Elective *
3
N/A

Electives
12 - 13
  Total Semester Hours:
18 - 20
 

Suggested Electives
LIT 250
Students will read and study American literary works written between 1600 - 1860 that are indicative, reflective of the time period's influential authors and evolving ideas.


Course Outline


American Literature Survey I *
3
LIT 251
Students will read, study, and examine American Literary works written after the Civil War to the present that are reflective of the time period's significant literary movements and changing intellectual social, and political perspectives.


Course Outline


American Literature Survey II *
3
LIT 274
Students will read the Old Testament, Apocrypha, and New Testament. By studying in the Bible's many genres and tones, students will discover that after many centuries the Bible remains a compelling literary masterpiece.


Course Outline


Bible as Literature *
3
LIT 150
Study of various forms and types of literature for the intellectual stimulation of the small child and storytelling and oral interpretation techniques.


Course Outline


Children's Literature *
3
ENG 223
Students will understand the structure and elements of fiction and the writing process, produce fully-developed works of fiction, and demonstrate an understanding of the critical terminology of the creative writer.


Course Outline


Creative Writing/Fiction *
3
ENG 224
Students will understand the structure and elements of poetry and the writing process, produce fully developed works of poetry and demonstrate an understanding of the critical terminology of the creative writer.


Course Outline


Creative Writing/Poetry *
3
PHI 280
Introduction to issues and theories of ethics. Includes historical survey of major value systems and contemporary issues.

Course Outline


Ethics
3
LIT 147
Students will read, discuss, and analyze short stories and novels written by different authors from a variety of time periods as a way of appreciating and understanding the purposes, forms, terms, and critical approaches associated with these two literacy modes.


Course Outline


Introduction to Fiction *
3
ART 181
Students will enrich their knowledge of film art and their abilities to critically analyze and evaluate films. By viewing and discussing a variety of films, students will understand film techniques, directorial styles, genres, structure, critical approaches, and cultural influences.


Course Outline


Introduction to Film Appreciation *
3
PHI 270
An introduction to philosophical questioning and reasoning. This course will include an historical survey of western philosophy focusing on the development of specific branches within the field, including epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, philosophy of science, and social/political philosophy.

Course Outline


Introduction to Philosophy
3
LIT 270
Students will study women as both writers and characters in literature written by women in English. Students will explore important themes and ideas, as well as learn about form, technique, and literary terms.


Course Outline


Literature of Women *
3
LIT 252
An introduction to the literary and cultural traditions of Native American, African American, and Hispanic American people and to general issues of cultural marginalization of minorities in the American experience.


Course Outline


Multicultural American Literature *
3
HUM 120
An introduction to major myths and legends spanning from Ancient Greece to Modern America with an emphasis on how the motifs, archetypes, and themes are consistently revived in popular culture.


Course Outline


Myths and Legends *
3
LIT 260
Students will read and study British literary works to 1800 that are indicative and reflective of the time period's influential authors and evolving ideas.


Course Outline


Survey of English Literature I
3
LIT 261
Students will read and study British literary works from 1800 to the present that are indicative and reflective of the time period's influential authors and evolving ideas.


Course Outline


Survey of English Literature II *
3
PHI 232
This course is designed to promote cultural diversity associated with religious practices. It includes a survey of religious systems and examines concepts and theories related to the nature of deities, good and evil, reason and faith, ethics, and afterlife.

Course Outline


World Religions
3
   


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